vernacular architecture

from tradition to the future

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The articles problematize the understanding and implementation of principles and elements of traditional architecture in the past and its significance for contemporary and future theory and practice of the sustainable architectural design. Discussion started from the issue of the interpretation of the vernacular principles and element application in the Serbian architecture of the 19th and the first half of the 20th century in recent architectural historiography and theory. The examination of the roles of master-builders from Macedonia and Serbia in the development of vernacular architecture over the Balkan region in early 19th century telling us about dissemination of universal house concepts, forms and building techniques in the past, as well as finding innovative and specific solutions in creating the unique values of architectural heritage in old town Ohrid or in Stara Planina villages. Specific architectural elements of traditional houses, like courtyards in Cyprus and split levels of horizontal house plan in different Mediterranean and Balkan areas, are explored and discussed through its social, morphological, aesthetic and environmental aspects. Importance of preserving the traditional vernacular heritage as an element of cultural authenticity of the historic town squares and enhancement its acceptability is research whiten the modern sustainable urban development. Finally, we can conclude that vernacular architecture was created throughout history according to climatic-environmental, socio-cultural and socio-economic principles, with some specific variations according the local needs. There is no doubt that the lessons taught by traditional architecture can inspire contemporary architects and the reinterpretation of the sustainable principles and characteristics of the vernacular heritage can become our challenge for the future
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VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE IN SERBIA IN 19TH AND FIRST HALF OF 20TH CENTURIES
Transformation and Disappearance

Djordje Mandrapa, Vladimir Parežanin

THE ROLE OF MASTER-BUILDERS IN DEVELOPMENT OF TRADITIONAL OHRID HOUSE
Radmila Tomovska, Ana Radivojević

DISAPPEARING OF THE TRADITIONAL ARCHITECTURE
The Key Study of the Stara Planina Villages

Gorica B. Ljubenov , Mirjana Roter-Blagojević

SPLIT LEVEL HORIZONTAL HOUSE PLAN IN THE BALKAN VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE
Tihomir Obradović

SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF COURTYARDS IN CYPRUS VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE
Maria Philokyprou, Aimilios Michael

THE CRITERIA OF SUSTAINABLE RECONSTRUCTION AND ACCEPTANCE OF THE HISTORIC TOWN SQUARES IN SERBIA
Milica Milojević, Darko Petrović

MAPPING THE VERNACULAR ENVIRONMENT: SERBIAN VILLAGE ATLAS AS A STEP TOWARDS AN ECO-VILLAGE NETWORK
Ksenija Bunjak, Mladen Pešić

THE USE OF RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES IN URBAN PROTECTED CULTURAL–HISTORICAL AMBIENCES
Budimir Sudimac, Andjela Dubljević

ARCHITECTURAL SUSTAINABILITY – A NEW INSPIRATION
Maddalena Achenza